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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
didn't see anything like what we saw during the twilight of the john paul years, with the series of hospitalizations here in rome, or sort of spectacular public collapses, i think it's more simply that benedict xvi's diagnosis is that he's going to be celebrating his 86th birthday in april. we have seen him pairing back public commitments and so on. he believes that the energy required to lead the catholic church forward at this moment is beyond his capacities. and i think he's decided therefore, not to wait for a moment of crisis, but while he's still capable of doing so, to make the decision to step aside and let somebody else take the baton. >> reverend martin, people are using words like shocking, unprecedented, why is this such a surprise? why didn't anybody expect this except for his inner circle? >> well, it hasn't happened for centuries, and you know, as john allen was saying, there had been speculation, there was speculation about john paul ii and people knew benedict was frail and in a sense diminishing physically, but i think the fact it hadn't happened so long means i
that led back to the vatican as well. a lot of questions about what it would be. john paul ii, thinking about resigning, prepared letters of resignation, and both from 197. he turned 75 and 80, never went ahead with the resignations that he was thinking about. but it will be interesting to hear more as we understand why the pope -- the reasons behind why the pope has been called to resign, which will happen on february 28th. >>> other stories making news this morning. john berman has that too. >>> talking about the storm here. families and businesses in seven counties trying to recover from a violent tornado that tore a path through southern mississippi on sunday. ripping apart homes, shops, and causing damage to a university campus. 4,000 homes are still without power. 16 people are injured. and a storm chaser captured this terrifying sight. a funnel cloud in hattiesburg. that took the brunt of a series of reported twisters that just pounded the region overnight. >>> meanwhile, the northeast beginning dig out of a history-making blizzard. parts of the region, including the hardest hit
. >> and john paul would have been. >> a movie star. >> that gives you a sense of the different temperaments. yet the emotion that is now being really demonstrated as these cardinals say farewell face to face for the last time, all of them kissing the fisherman's ring which we know will be defaced and destroyed which benedict xvi's papacy ends. >> that's right. there are two instruments of the papal office, one is the ring and one is the official papal seal. the seal is kept in a safe in an office in the vatican. of course in the middle ages as you know, christiane be these were what were used to stamp paper bulls. which made them official. after a papacy had ended, someone might use the instruments to falsify papal documents. that's where the custom of destroying them came from. that will be honored at the end of benedict's papacy as well. >> thank you. we'll continue to watch this with all of you. back to you, john and zoraida in new york. >> it is interesting to see this as history is being made at the vatican. pope benedict xvi saying good-bye to the cardinals who have assembled and many
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
music all day. they waited for john, paul, george, and ringo to arrive and then later, there was a performance right here in washington, d.c. >>> lawmakers in britain have passed a bill requiring every dog owner to microchip their pet. the move is designed to cut down on the more than 100,000 dogs that are lost or dumped in the u.k. every year. >> reporter: judy maguire has a tight grip on her west highland terrier. >> she's pretty g. she stays by -- pretty good. she stays by. >> reporter: but if she did run off, there's a good chance her owner would find her because she has a microchip inside her. lawmakers in england are now requiring all dogs to be fitted with a chip that's coded with their owner's details. >> i want this to have a positive impact. there are 110,000 dogs get lost every year or get dumped. only about half of them get back to their original owners. >> reporter: the mandate goes into effect in three years. owners who don't comply could be slapped with an $800 fine. many animal shelters in england will put the chip in for free. it's tiny, just the size
benedict is no longer the pope, he has to give up the shoes but remember, john paul ii wore the red shoes for a couple weeks early on in his pontificate, then wore brown ones. the pope can really do what he wants. he's the supreme pontiff, the supreme ruler of the church and he kind of can make the rules himself and benedict made these himself today. >> interesting. although as you said, raymond, i say this, you know, can't change the doctrine, right? you do everything. >> can't do that. he can protect the doctrine but not amend it. >> let me talk about one other thing. he wears a ring, fisherman's ring. describe it to me and why he's going to actually destroy it. it looks kind of fluorescent green or yellow on his finger. >> now, this goes back to 1265. pope clement iv referenced this ring in one of his letters to a nephew. it is the sign and seal of his office. when you look closely, you are seeing a picture there, it is a bas relief of st. peter leaning over the edge of the boat pulling in fish. this shows and indicates that the pope, whoever wears this ring, is the successor of st. pe
, pope john paul. before the body is moved across st. peter's square to the basilica. unlike all of the past popes whose reign ended in this room, benedict is the first to leave office still breathing. like a king, attending his own funeral. today, the dean of the college of cardinals thanked him for his service. benedict stood up and embraced him. the pope wasn't expected to speak, but he did. saying, among you is also the future pope, to whom i pledge my unconditional reverence and obedience. that hasn't been an issue for 600 years. today, vatican cameras will follow benedict's departure, minute-by-minute. 19 cameras documenting his trip, live. every angle covered, from his final wave at st. peter's. they'll be there with him on the helicopter, as he flies to castel gandolfo. there, he'll greet the faithful one last time from the balcony. and then, tonight at 8:00 p.m., the swiss guard will leave and the gates will close. symbolically signaling that benedict is no longer pope. so, who is actually in charge in the interim? the papal camalango is in state. we're sure it's going t
. >> well said. >> amen. >> i think it shows a lot of humility. in april of 2005 when pope john paul ii died we broadcasted "hardball" from rome. as we closed our last show from there, let's listen. look at these people standing for hours, day and night, through the avenues of rome, packed together as if they had been caught and crushed in an industrial strength trash compacter. there they stood seeking no edge, plotting no photo opportunity, playing none of the games that people do in politics, in business, in so much of life. this is no pub lisible stunt or initial stock offering or inside deal or anything but the purest most obvious most grandly transparent display of individual devotion. voting with your feet. >> thanks four your wise and warm words. thanks for coming on and enl deon, mr. america and french canadian and all kind of things. >>> dick cheney from the sublime to the ridiculous. dick cheney can't stand the fact that his side lost the election, dick. that he and his neocons are under assault and in retreat thank god. he's saying president obama is picking second class people.
pope john paul ii. >> do you think this is overshadowed over a time that should be honoring pope benedict? >> yes. i think it is. he's a humble man, a very kind man. if you were to meet him and you're a nobody, he speaks to you as if you're the most important person in the world. he's a very humble world. in his heart, he's a good man. he loves the church and wants the best for the church. think about it. is there anyone in the world who has put down power willingly? >> certainly in this country. when is the conclave going to start? >> probably monday the congregations will begin and shortly there after they will start that conclave. they want a pope by easter. they know the world is watching them. it's important to the church and to the larger world. >> father, great to have you here. >> thank you. appreciate it. >>> that wraps up this hour of "jansing & co." i'm chris can jansing. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't
choosing a quieter life. so very different from his predecessor john paul who stayed until the very end. anthony from pennsylvania witnessed both pope's last sermons. >> they're courage in different ways. in opposite ways but the same degree of courage. >> reporter: the pope summoning the strength to say good-bye, giving up one of the most powerful roles on earth. meeting publicly with the faithful one last time. >> savannah as the pope got up to leave. there was a wave of emotion. people calling out to him, waving good-bye. many people held up banners saying thank you in return. pope benedict told the faithful i have never felt this way. >> thank you. greg burke is the senior communications adviser just with the pope in the final audience. good morning it's good to see you. >> good morning. >> sometimes tone can be lost in translation. you heard this address. how does the pope seem to you these last few days? what's his mood? . he's a serene person. i have known him as cardinal ratzinger. he took a lot of hits from john paul ii. i see him now calmer than ever. he showed a little emotio
the last pope, one that we knew growing up, pope john paul ii, literally allowed the world to watch him die. that was part of the process of sharing life, willie. >> yeah. this pope says he's old and fragile, unable to travel, but you make a good point about the previous pope. john, we've heard many times now that the next pope, whoever that may be, will have to confront the sexual abuse scandal, puts it mildly. that has consumed the roman catholic church for so long. what will that mean exactly? what will a pope do? a new pope in terms of confronting that? will he come out immediately in an opening address? will he purge some of the priests? what do you think that pope will do at least from a public relations point of view to change the perception? >> well, it's the perception and the reality. it's the most disturbing thing about any self-protecting institution. you see this as the catholic chump has, for decade upon decade now, put its own institutional survival and its own institutional dignity, really, ahead of the interests of the weakest people in its care, its children. i think many
in 1996 by pope john paul ii and can only be changed by another pope. that is what benedict did at that. one of his last official acts. the pope gave his final sunday blessing to huge crowds in st. peter's square. no date has been set for the con chraf to begin, in order to to have a new pope by march 24th. the new pope would have to be installed by sunday, march 17th. hence why they had to get permission to move up the date. martha: everything moving forward on that whole time period right now. a little bit of news also this morning, lauren. we're learning about a cardinal in britain involved in some controversy decided no not to attend. he will tell us about that? >> reporter: martha, this is unprecedented. this really doesn't happen. we're in a season of unprecedented events. there will be one less cardinal attending the conclave, cardinal keith o'brien of scotland, england's highest ranking catholic leader is resigning as archbishop in the wake of allegations of misconduct. british newspapers report that o'brien was accused by three current priests or one former priest acting inappr
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
supported. it goes back really to the way you led this segment, which is with rand paul and john mccain and others talking about do the democrats want to do something or do they just want to -- they know the answer to that. the democrats passed the dream act in the house in 2010. john mccain was part of the republican filibuster against a majority of votes in the senate to advance the dream act and put it on the president's desk. there are many criticisms you can make about both parties being very opportunistic. that's what political parties are. they look for political opportunities, but we have a record here. both parties know the record. this group of democrats has done everything can you do facing obstruction to try to pass the dream act, which is stronger, according to many emgregs advocates, than what we have on the table now. >> that's because it was done by executive order, right? jose, really quickly before we let you go, are the -- the president is talking about march for immigration reform. how bullish or bearish are you on that date? >> i think by the end of the senate w
of language. after john paul ii it's now taken for granted that the pope shubd a master of many language s. you also look for skill and organization. the pope manages a large bureaucracy. there's a great need for reform of that. but i go back primarily, someone who is an effective evangelizer in today's society. >> first off, cardinal francis arinze. >> i would be surprised if he is elected pope just given his age. pope benedict was 78 when he was elected now is resigning because of old age. cardinal arinze is already 80. he is a bit of a television personality, especially in the english speaking world, he has become well known. very articulate. charming, funny man. he is also involved in the interreligious dialogue for many years, which would make him an attractive figure. >> cardinal peter terkurkson is getting a lot of attention. age 64, so not a problem there. >> yeah. he speaks perfect english, has a sense of the international church. he is also the head of the council for peace and justice. very involved in economic and political issues, but leans a bit left in terms of the mainstray
and racism take over this country, that the protected against john mccain and sarah palin and protected us against romney and ron paul. so i pray to god that people stop and think about what is really motivating this country with hatred and racism and deception. but the state of the union is great. it helps you understand what's going on and stop and thing about what's going on. thank you and have a great day. and to belittle 12-year-olds, keep it up, son.- host: on twitter -- here is some history, state of the union facts. here is a question usa today" is asking-- eddie in texas, independent. caller: i think the state of the union is pretty bad right now. i don't think the president will say that. host: how much does the speech matter to you? do you pay attention to what the president says during this address? caller: yes, i do pay attention. i think everybody should pay attention. host: do you think they are a highlight of the political year, the message that comes out of the white house? caller: yes, it is hopes and wishes for the country and once he has done in the past. host: reginald
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)